Self-publishing

Heart Potato

Valentine's came early as I discovered this heart shaped rooster potato when making the dinner.

Valentine’s came early as I discovered this heart shaped rooster potato when making the dinner.

 

‘Oh yes,’ said Fairly Dave. ‘It’s commonly known that there’s too much obesity among tellies hanging round looking at couch potatoes – although they are very interesting. It’s not that often you find a potato in the shape of a couch – not since the supermarkets conspired in that ‘campaign for beautiful vegetables’. And in my opinion it is a shame because sometimes there is nothing more alluring than a two legged carrot.’

Extract from the adorable Housewife with a Half-Life 

Paperback.

 

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31 Days: Eliza Green – Why Self-Publishing can be good for Debut Authors

Eliza Green1

Publishing is a hair-raising and confusing game at the moment. Lists are said to be shrinking and even well known authors sometimes struggle to make a living from publishing. There are also many publishing possibilities and many authors are choosing to let readers decide by bringing their books straight to market with the help of professional editing and design services.

Eliza Green is just embarking on the journey into publishing. Her debut novel Becoming Human – part of what will be the Exilon 5 trilogy has just been released. Eliza has worked in many industries from fashion to sport to finance, but caught the writing bug several years ago and has now released her first novel, BECOMING HUMAN, part one of the Exilon 5 trilogy. Since Eliza was young, she has always been a fan of science fiction television shows and films and is bringing that love to her new trilogy. She hopes to capture the imagination of readers who shy away from the genre with her new novel, set on Earth and Exilon 5 by writing what she calls ‘down to earth’ science fiction

Eliza is here with us to day to share with us her thoughts on the advantages of self-publishing for new authors.

Why Self Publishing can be good for debut authors

Background

I’ve been writing for four years. Over those years, I wrote three books, submitted two to agents and publishers and resubmitted one with serious rewrites and a much more favourable response from a reputable agency. The submission process didn’t come to anything, so I decided to self publish my most recent work, BECOMING HUMAN.

Process

I tried my best to plan the release accordingly, but the date kept getting pushed back because I discovered new things I had to do before I could proceed to the next step.  For example, I commissioned a cover designer early so that I would have an agreed design well in advance of my ambitious release date of late November.  What I didn’t calculate for was that my designer would need my final page count so he could set the size of the book, including the all important spine width. That meant I had to have the final edit completed on my work (which I hadn’t). Three weeks of solid editing ensued and my miscalculations pushed the final cover reveal back by a month. You have no idea what is going to happen when you self publish, but it can be an interesting learning curve. The more obstacles you face and overcome, the less likely you are to repeat them.

Promotion Decisions

With very strict deadlines and the pressures of a full time job, I managed to release the ebook in Mid December and the print version five days after. I enrolled my ebook exclusively in the KDP select programme, which means that I’m not allowed to release the book digitally on any other platform for three months from the publish date. That brings me up to mid March. Why did I do this? Because it can be a good way of bringing a new book to Amazon Prime members which in turn could be good publicity for my work. Of course, that all sounds great in principle but I can’t sit back and wait for things to happen. I have to work out how to drum up interest in my book. How can I point the members to my work other than enrolment in a programme for which I have very few statistics?

At the moment, my marketing plan is a bit trial and error, but I will learn what works as time goes on and that should benefit the launch for my second book.

A learning opportunity

At some point, all writers dream of securing that elusive publishing deal through traditional means. I can understand that, I was one of those writers. But it can be frustratingly slow and instead of agents/publishers seeking out your talent, you have to convince them of yours. The rejections can take the tarnish off what should be an exciting time in a writer’s life. If you do secure a book deal, it can be a great thing. The agent will guide you and the publisher will edit and format your work before publishing it.  But for new authors that don’t see the work that goes into publishing as indie authors do, this could be a disadvantage.

Learning to promote yourself and your work

Indie authors are competing strongly with their traditionally published counterparts on digital platforms such as Amazon. And what self publishing has taught me is that you have to promote yourself and your work. While a traditional book deal is always nice, promotional efforts could be lost if the author is not involved.

Confidence

So, the ideal scenario? Understanding what goes into publishing your own work could make you a better author. Unless a publishing house has a marketing department, you will have to do the promotional work yourself. A friend recently told me about a guy who self published his novel but he didn’t have much success with it. He suggested I speak to him to get an idea of what went wrong. I don’t need to. I can list the main reason why. He didn’t promote himself or his work. Somebody once said about debut authors, ‘Nobody cares about your book.’ It’s up to you to convince them otherwise and self publishing can give you the confidence to do that.

Thanks to Eliza for this food for thought and I wish her every success with Becoming Human. She is currently working on ALTERED REALITY, book 2 in the Exilon 5 trilogy.

eg-bh-cover-front-small

Becoming Human

Two worlds. Two species. One terrifying secret.

In 2163, a polluted and overcrowded Earth forces humans to search for a new home. But the exoplanet they target, Exilon 5, is occupied. Having already begun a massive relocation programme, Bill Taggart is sent to monitor the Indigenes, the race that lives there. He is a man on the edge. He believes the Indigenes killed his wife, but he doesn’t know why. His surveillance focuses on the Indigene Stephen, who has risked his life to surface during the daytime.
Stephen has every reason to despise the humans and their attempts to colonise his planet. To protect his species from further harm, he must go against his very nature and become human. But one woman holds a secret that threatens Bill’s and Stephen’s plans, an untruth that could rip apart the lives of those on both worlds.

BECOMING HUMAN is available in print and Kindle ebook format (exclusively until mid March). Afterwards, it will be available in several other formats through Smashwords.

Where to buy:  Amazon.com    

Amazon.co.uk   

Amazon.de

 

COMPETITION

Eliza has kindly offered a free copy of her book. All you have to do is add a comment below. Tell us about your favourite science fiction film., Favourite science fiction television show or Favourite alien (humorous or serious is fine).

Self-published in a bookshop

On writing.ie I share what I have learned so far about getting your self-published book into a  (I am stocked in Dubray books in Bray and in Hughes and Hughes stores in Dublin) and about bookshop launches, as well as the success of a self-published author in the UK at getting his book stocked at Waterstones. Click here for more

I recently joined Wattpad. It’s a platform for writers to share work (both sample chapters of published work and new writing). The aim is for writers is to connect with other writers and find new readers and for readers to find new work they’ll enjoy. They have some high profile advocates such as Margaret Atwood and some serious investment – I’ll give more details in a later post. The advantage for writers is that there is a huge audience in the millions already signed up so your work has the potential to be widely read. However like all platforms you have to attract readers and followers, so work must go into your involvement there. This is a consideration when we’re already stretched keeping up with many platforms. However if you want to have a look it’s www.wattpad.com and here is my page if you want to read any pieces (I have two short stories and an extract from Housewife with a Half-Life on it) or connect if you decide to join.

 

The business of self-publishing: Bookshop launches

Self-publishing is becoming a viable and accepted method for writers to either bring out a book that is hard for publishers to define, for traditionally published writers to relaunch old out of print titles electronically or through print on demand, for writers to supplement their traditional titles or fund their writing on the path to traditional publication, to write and publish creative, experimental and artistic work that may have a more niche following. To be commended and recommended, self-published work needs to be of high quality and the self-publisher needs to apply the principles of professionalism and good business.

In this weeks article on writing.ie The Business of Self-Publishing, I talk about how to make self-publishing work, through strong products, marketing savvy, funding initatives and more. Take a look at the full article here.

I recently launched the paperback of Housewife with a Half-Life in a bookshop. There are pros and cons for the self-publisher in taking on a Bookshop launch but overall I feel that it’s benefits outweighed any drawbacks. I recently wrote an article exploring the merits of a bookshop launch.

To Launch or Not to Launch: A second opinion

When invited to hold a bookshop launch for my debut self-published book Housewife with a Half-Life in a local store, I thought about the pros and cons. I’m here to say why, on balance, that while there are many arguments against a bookshop launch for the self-publisher, I’m glad that I went ahead.

First, the facts in black and white:

Having a bookshop launch is exhausting.

These are some of the tasks that need to be done ahead of time:

Organise books: While CreateSpace, the POD company I used, have many distribution channels, the Irish ones are not included in this. So it was necessary to send off (and pay for) a consignment of books upfront and then organise to get them to the bookshop.

Arrange publicity: I created a press release and emailed as many of the local papers, radio stations etc as I could. I also sent a copy of the book out to selected media people. I invited people through text, email and social media. This was a big job. I also organised a speaker, some refreshments etc.

These activities were all done in tandem with an online launch and blog tour marketing and publicity were all encompassing.

This article is guest posted on Catherine Ryan Howard’s blog. For the rest of the article, click here.

I’d appreciate your thoughts and experiences on your self-publishing journey and if you’ve done a ‘real-life’ book launch whether or not you found it useful.

In the meantime I’m bringing out several mini-collections of my short stories, some of which were shortlisted in prizes such as the Bridport, Fish and Hennessy New Irish Writing XO awards. Here’s what I’ve released so far. I’ll let you know how this venture goes.

New short story collection, #Fridayflash and Smashwords news

Self-published in a library

Smashwords have just announced an exciting new library initiative for their bestselling titles. Read more about it here.

Publishing is in a state

Here’s a very very interesting article about the state of publishing today and the role of ‘indie’ publishers in that.

Today’s #Fridayflash

Today my #fridayflash short fiction is on the amwriting website which features daily blogposts from authors and fiction on Fridays. My story this week is called Brown and Blue, you can read it here.

Mini short story collections

Many of you who’ve read the blog would have read my #fridayflashes and other fiction. I have many many longer short stories, some published in various magazines and some that have never been read. I’ve decided to release a few mini collections for Kindle ebook and app. Other formats will follow. The first one is called ‘Stories to make you go ‘ah’. There are three stories about love, life and desire. One of the stories in the collection was longlisted in the Sean O’ Faolain prize.

Stories to make you to ‘ah’ UK

Stories to make you go ‘ah’ US/IRELAND

Dear Agent for writers and last free day

The wonderful Nicola Morgan, of the great writing and publishing site Help, I need a publisher! author of 90 books including Write to be Published has just brought out Dear Agent: Write the Letter that Sells your Book. As readers of her blog will know, the advice she gives is always realistic, practical and sprinkled with her wonderful dry wit. Read the full article with her at writing.ie to get some tips and a flavour of the book.The book is on special offer this weekend and can be downloaded for Kindle or for reading on your laptop (you can download a free Kindle app. Well worth it for every novelist about to submit work!

On a personal note, I know you’re probably tired of hearing about Housewife with a Half-Life and personally I’m uncomfortable with relentless self-promotion. I know that if you’re interested you will read the book at some point and if it’s not your thing then no problem. However the reality for self-publishers is that somehow we need to become visible to the general public and the way of doing that is to gain higher rankings on Amazon in order to be seen.

This August 10th is the last day that the book is on a special free promotion, so if it could get a big push today that would be great. So if you’re interested and haven’t read it, get your free copy today. Thanks a million.

Susan Strong is a suburban housewife who is literally disintegrating. When Fairly Dave, a kilt-sporting spaceman arrives through the shower head to warn her, she knows things are serious. When she and her precocious four year old twins, Pluto and Rufus, get sucked through Chilled Foods into another universe it gets even messier. Where household appliances are more alive and dangerous than they seem, Geezers have Entropy Hoovers and the Spinner’s Cataclysmic convertor could rip reality apart, Susan Strong is all that’s holding the world together.

Through this madcap, feel-good adventure, Susan and Fairly Dave travel alternate universes to find Susan’s many selves, dodge the Geezers and defeat the evil memory bankers. From dystopian landscapes and chicken dinners, to the surreal world of Las Vegas and bubble universes, can Susan Strong reintegrate her bits and will it be enough to save us all?

Amazon UK

Amazon US/Ireland

Free Kindle Apps for laptop, phone etc

Why I used my Kindle free days when I had decided not to

The Background

I originally signed up for the Kindle free days to be part of the promotion for the launch of the wonderful Jawbreakers anthology in May. I had only launched Housewife with a Half-Life a few days before so perhaps it wasn’t the best time to give it away for free but being part of a British nationwide launch perhaps gave me a wider audience/exposure that I would not have had otherwise.

What are Kindle Free Days good for?

Since Housewife was my debut novel as A.B.Wells I was interested to read how Kindle free days had helped some self-publishers gain extra readers and sales subsequent to the promotion. But there seemed to be some caveats. This strategy seemed to have worked best for those who were a) releasing books in the earlier ebook days before the deluge of ebooks and free offerings b) for authors who already had a following from traditional publication or earlier books c) for authors who were trying to promote a series or later books (they would give an earlier one away free.

But that wasn’t me

As the end of my Kindle free period approached, I realised that I did not fit any of these criteria. My comedy in the universe was a new departure, both from my literary work as Alison Wells (published in anthologies and known on the blog) and was the first book I had to offer. So what could possibly be gained by using the FREE DAYS.

All that work for FREE?

Another issue that has been much discussed is the concept of FREE itself. Some self-publishers enjoy the idea of the work being the thing, making it available in a democratic way and being read is the most important thing. FREE is part of the FREEDOM of being Indie. Other self-publishers, while applauding these sentiments are also concerned about whether a constant supply of free books engenders the expectation of never having to pay,  particularly for ebooks. While people would be happy to pay €10 euro (about $11 £8) for a paperback, an electronic version may not seem as valuable (and is easier for both the writer and the reader to discount in both senses of the word).

I’ve sold about 80 books in real world transactions (in bookshops or direct) and made a reasonable return, especially of course on the direct sales. My initial price of $2.99 dollars and its equivalent allowed me to be on the 70% royalty on many sales for the ebook. Again a reasonable amount. As a first time author without a track record, realistically, breaking even might be a goal, much as the accounts of bestsellers are thrilling and are always hoped for. I had costs, for sure, several hundred pounds/euros for a designer and editor, marketing materials for my real world launch and initial outlays on purchasing 160 books to sell to bookshops and direct. I personally don’t have an outside income (at the moment I’m at home with my four children). We live on my husbands wages. I need to cover costs at least. The book took months to write and a year to edit and bring to publication. All writers know how much work goes into producing something of quality. Again, why give it away for free?

So why did you change your mind?

Ideally I would have used the free days when the sequel The Meaning of Life is Monday was out. But Kindle free days are to be used within three months. It’s now or never. So what made me change my mind?

1: The possibility of widening my reader base

I’m in this for the longer term. I may need to get my skates on and release further material that people can click on when they finish Housewife but I will still reach new people who might visit my blog (there is a hyperlink in the ebook!) and find out what else I write and when it will be out. I might reach a particular person who will enjoy my book, become an advocate, write a review (make the movie – okay one can dream. Matthew McConaghy as Fairly Dave (the kilted spaceman with luminescent emotions would be interesting 🙂 )

As a marketing hotspot

Running Kindle free days gives me an event around which to talk about my book and blog about things like Kindle free days and to link to my new publications of short collections of short stories (under the name Alison Wells) that will be out in the next few days.

I might just go up the Amazon charts

While like Nicola Morgan I’m not a fan of tricks and games used to push books, such as constant self-promotion on Twitter, online, befriending just to sell, garnering reviews that aren’t authentic, the free day option is a legitimate tool to try to make your book stand out from the crowd. I believe in Housewife with a Half-Life. I have other books in drawers that I didn’t believe in so much. I engaged and editor and designer and did everything I could to make the book as good as I could. Other people believe in the book. I think it’s a heartwarming and uplifting read and I want to give it the best chance I can.

Last time Housewife with a Half-Life was free for one day, was downloaded 500 times but I didn’t see many follow on sales. I don’t know what will happen this time. Maybe I’ll come back and tell you later. But despite my reservations, I hope that Housewife with a Half-Life can benefit from this little boost and that if you read it you’ll enjoy and come back and tell me.

Update: August 2012

As a matter of interest, at the end of my 4 kindle free days I had a total of 3000 downloads and have seen consistent sales since then, not in huge numbers (tens) but beyond what was happening before the free days. While on Kindle free Housewife with a Half-Life went to number 3 in sci-fi free and close to (tantalisingly close to) the top 100 kindle reads in .com and .uk. From talking to other authors I can attribute the continuing extra sales to Housewife with a Half-Life having become visible in the “also bought” lists. So in terms of gaining visibility, the Kindle free days were successful.

Let me know what you’ve decided to do with your Kindle free days and how it’s worked out for you or any of your thoughts on the concept of FREE.

A last little marketing plug. Note: Housewife with a Half-Life is no longer free but it’s just 99c/77p until the end of August.

Here are some of the things people have said in the reviews:

“this book was recommended to me and really didn’t know what to expect but wasn’t able to put it down, fantastic, funny and pure comedy from start to finish 10/10”

“A brilliantly humorous book which had me laughing from the start!”

Amazon UK

US/Ireland

My self-publishing experience

Today I’ve visited the blog of Debz Hobbs Wyatt who works as small publisher Bridgehouse to share my self-publishing experience, the areas where I had costs and how I found the whole process.

Speaking to an editor and other writing professionals we decided that it might be a good contender for self-publishing as it’s more a genre work than my other writing.Publishing is in a huge state of flux right now and I was interested to learn about self-publishing, to try to connect directly with my readers (I already have a very established blog) and I liked the freedom of being able to get my work out there. The skills and attention to detail I’m learning through self-publishing can be applied to traditional publishing as well.

Please click here to read the whole interview.

I’d also like to share with you news of the release of The New Big Book of Hope.

“This book will save lives. To live without hope is the ultimate deprivation. The Hope Foundation reaches out to the street children of Kolkata, India, on a daily basis: rescuing sick and abandoned children; delivering food and clean water to the slums; providing crèches where destitute and slum-dwelling mothers can safely leave their children while they do what they can to earn money; running its health-care programme, including its new hospital; fighting child labour and child-trafficking; breaking the cycle of poverty through education in its many coaching centres.
This extraordinary collection celebrates The Hope Foundation and – hopefully – will play a significant role in publicizing and supporting its courageous work. A potent blend of fiction, poetry, memoir and non-fiction, the contributions explore the theme of ‘hope’ and its vital presence in all our lives.
With its astonishing range of bestselling authors, political figures, business people and media celebrities, The New Big Book of Hope eBook has something for everyone. Claudia Carroll, Don Conroy, Brian Crowley, Brian Keenan, Sinead Moriarty, Kate Kerrigan and over forty other unlikely bedfellows rub shoulders – the only common denominator being their considerable talent. And in this special eBook edition, four new writers – Alison Wells, David Fairclough, Fr. David Keating and Orla Coffey – have been selected for their contributions in making this book a truly unique collection.

This book is for such a good cause. It also contains my prizewinning story Flashes of Entropy and Hope, a flash fiction medley which is part of a longer work.

The book is available as an ebook here

Different versions are available as follows.

Here’s Hoping (Fiction Collection)

Hope Works (Non Fiction and Poetry Collection)

There’ll be more posts here on writer’s block, writing focus and further self-publishing experiences such as getting books into a bookshop and awareness building efforts.

Why I self-published both paperback & ebook

The joy of holding your own paperback in your hands. So exciting!

One of the main attractions of self-publishing is the ease with which you can now produce and distribute your masterpiece and along with that how you can offer it as a very reasonably priced ebook which any right minded individual will of course shell out for. All you have to do is upload your file to Kindle Direct Publishing and Smashwords and (after a short wait in some cases) your book is available in a variety of formats and across a number of outlets including Amazon and Barnes and Noble. What more could you wish for? And the wisdom seems to be that those amazing self-publishers who are making millions out of this are doing it on the downloads. I hear no tales of truck loads of books whizzing round the country, book signings even. The electronic is embraced utterly. Indeed many small presses are embracing the economic feasibility of being digital first outfits, Proxima books, Crooked Cat Publishing, and Carina Press are examples.

I rejoice in and embrace the new technologies that have allowed me, singlehandedly (well almost) to present my work to the world from the comfort of my own home. I attended a One-Stop Publishing Conference in 2010, where I listened to the fascinating self-publication journey of A.J. Healy, writer of the children’s book Tommy Storm. It was quite an early endeavour in this self-publishing lark, a heroic tale of negotiations with Chinese printers and long hours on the road touting physical copies of his book round the independent bookshops of Ireland. It required levels of physical and financial dedication that the ebook publisher might shudder at.

Yet I have decided to provide a paperback option to those who wish to buy Housewife with a Half-Life. And while my tale does not compare to A.J. Healy’s, it also required more financial and physical dedication than my ebook version. I actually had to leave the house and travel several miles down a motorway to meet the real life people (lovely people) who had offered me a chance, as a local author, to launch my book in their bookshop (Hughes and Hughes, Dundrum).  I had to order a quantity of my own book costing several hundred euro upfront as the distribution channels made available by the publisher (CreateSpace) were either not the right ones for the Irish bookseller or were not available yet (haven’t figured out which yet). Ordering your own book is similar to the partnership publishing offered by some small presses where they ask you to invest in a certain number of copies of your own book. The number can be quite reasonable and enables the small press to get your book out and use their contacts to promote and review it, or in the worst cases the upfront payment you make is money for nothing. The publishers are offering nothing more than what you could do yourself for less. (There are ways in Ireland for the self-publisher to access distribution networks and book chains and I’ll outline those in another post. )

In my case I used CreateSpace, an Amazon venture, to create my paperback. This simple process which I will describe in another post, enabled me to upload a cover file (I had engaged a designer who provided me with the files), to upload my interior file, to review online and physically by ordering proof copies and to have my paperback available on the most commonly used online bookstore and other associates.

But why did I bother to go through the additional work in producing a paperback? Why did I publish both an ebook and paperback?

It wasn’t that much extra work

In terms of the quality and production of the book, much of it was done already. The cover design and editing had been paid for. In terms of proof reading, having a physical copy actually enabled me to find outstanding mistakes and update the electronic versions as well. There was an additional cost in ordering proofs but as I’ve said, it was worth it. Much of the promotion work, posts, adding author details was also duplicate from the electronic version.

I was born in the old days and so were my friends

I’m open to what is to come in the future of books and electronic media. I found this article on bendy e-paper fascinating. However books as physical artifacts are intrinsic to my history as a reader and a writer, I still love having the physical book in front of me and it goes so far that if I happen to read a book in electronic format on my Kindle that I really admire I will go out and buy a physical copy. For many of my contemporaries and friends, many of whom are not regularly on the internet, a book is a 3 dimensional thing. When they see that I have a real-life book on offer, they are more likely to buy it or read it and even those I know electronically only have voiced a preference to read my upcoming work in book format. Of course I’m not just selling to friends but what is true for a proportion of them must still be true for a proportion of the reading public as a whole, particularly the age range I’m aiming at with Housewife with a Half-Life. On a personal note I was absolutely thrilled when my CreateSpace paperback order arrived unexpectedly yesterday almost two weeks ahead of schedule. Look at the picture. Do I look happy?

A paperback has given me greater kudos and opened up further publicity avenues.

I am so grateful to Hughes and Hughes bookstore in Dundrum for offering to launch my book as a local author. They are working very hard in drumming up publicity for the launch event which will take place on 22nd June in Dundrum shopping centre, Dublin and having a third party working on my behalf lends my novel credentials and helps to make it a viable project. We hope to get newspaper and radio interest too and in general get the book talked about in the public eye which is so important. I will also launch the paperback online (having already launched the ebook). This lets me contact Goodreads readers and organise an extended book tour. All these activities add to the visibility of the book. I can also try further techniques such as book tweeting services and advertising to raise the profile of Housewife with a Half-Life.

I am not saying that any of this will make me a bestseller but having a paperback as well as an ebook a) gives my heart and soul a satisfaction that personally I would not have had with just the ebook version b) makes marketing, PR and selling sense. What about you? Have you chosen against a paperback option for whatever reason and why does that make sense for you? As  a reader do you think it makes any difference what format the book comes in? Let me know what you think.

News of paperback launch of Housewife with a Half-Life 12th & 22nd June

I launched Housewife with a Half-Life as an ebook on May 8th and I’m delighted now to be able to announce the paperback launch of the book. The online launch of the paperback will be on the 12th of June. I’ll be building up to it with video excerpts and posts about the process of writing the book and using CreateSpace. On launch week there’ll be a blog tour where I’ll be guest posting and answering questions about my writing life and Housewife with a Half-Life itself. Some of you were very kind and mentioned my ebook launch on release day. If anyone is interested in a more indepth post or a review copy of the book please contact me at alison at brierwell dot com, comment here or tweet me @alisonwells.

In exciting news I would also like to announce that there will be an indeed 3-D launch of Housewife with a Half-Life. Hughes and Hughes in Dundrum have very kindly offered to host the real-life launch of the book in their shop on the evening of 7pm Friday 22nd June (more details to follow) . If you are in the Dublin area it would mean so much to me if you were able to pop along to the launch. There will be a reading and refreshments and general merriment and a chance for a summer meet-up/tweet-up for the writing community.

And in talking about blog posts big thanks to Catherine Ryan Howard today for having me on her brilliant, slick & informative self-publishing blog Catherine, Caffinated, talking about my first steps on the road of selling my books as a self-published writer.

If you think you might be interested in reviewing or asking me questions on your blog, here’s a little more information.

Housewife with a Half-Life is a rollercoaster adventure through inner and outer space as Susan Strong travels round alternate worlds with her Fairly God Father, Fairly Dave to find the pieces of herself that are left around alternate universes. She  must save us all from Universal Devastation but not without making the dinner first. A light, funny but heartwarming read, it will appeal to women, family men, geek mums, Dr. Who fans and anyone who cares about this big and beautiful universe.

I’m happy to send gift Kindle copies to reviewers (or other electronic formats) for your sites. If desired I can make a paperback available also. Any reviews or shout outs in the next few weeks would be really appreciated.  If you are interested in reviewing my book as a reviewer, leave a comment here, email alison@brierwell.com or tweet me @alisonwells.

I know that some of you kindly expressed the wish to have a copy of the paperback in your hands. It will be wonderful if you can join me on the 12th for the celebration of the three dimensional version of the book.

Thanks for all your support for Housewife with a Half-Life so far and I look forward to continuing to spread the word about the book across the universe!